How to innovate: Sony camcorder with projector

April 11, 2011 · Posted in innovation ·  

The full list of outcomes for video is:

  • Recording
  • Storing
  • Editing
  • Locating / Selecting
  • Viewing
  • Disposing

Doing each of those anywhere, anytime, for whoever, for the price desired with no hassle is the ultimate.

Including a projector on the camcorder satisfied an outcome that was under-satisfied. It also utilized existing components so the extra feature was less cost than an extra device.

Future innovations will be in editing, and selected sharing. As I’ve mentioned in other posts augmented or diminished reality could be useful in a camcorder.

Women's fashion innovation hides camel toe

April 11, 2011 · Posted in innovation, prediction ·  


Camel toes occurs when a woman’s pants are too tight the fabric rides up expose the shape of her intimate area. Smooth Groove prevents the embarrassing effect.

This product follows in a long line of women’s undergarments that strategically reveal or conceal some portion of the figure. The obvious solution for camel toe is to not wear pants that are so tight they leave nothing to the imagination. The goal of such tight pants is to leave a select bit to the imagination, and thus the opportunity for Smooth Groove. The maker put a lot of thought into the design of the product and the image for the product.

Now that Smooth Grove is available to prevent displaying camel toe expect another product that artificially creates it. Wearing pants that are tight enough to expose the shape underneath is uncomfortable. It would be much more comfortable and potentially esthetically pleasing to wear a “New Groove”.

Prediction: Inhaled Vitamins

April 5, 2011 · Posted in prediction ·  

While working on a innovations for food I came up with inhaled vitamins. A quick check on Google reveals it will be available for sale in 2011. It’s getting harder to stay ahead of innovations.

I don’t spend much time examining food innovations so I’m not surprised the industry is farther ahead than other things I look at regularly. My last food innovation took 3 years to come out and that one I told to a product manager at Wrigley.

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