Alternative to Closing for Legendary Greek Restaurant

March 26, 2008 · Posted in economics, problem solving, strategy · 1 Comment 

New Hellas Cafe Detroit

The 80 year old owner of Detroit’s oldest Greek restaurant New Hellas Cafe, Gus Anton, is shutting the business down claiming he needs the rest and can’t keep up with it any more. Surely he deserves to retire after 57 years of running the business his father started in 1901. Unfortunately shutting the business down means 35 people lose their jobs. Anton say he hopes the workers will get rehired if the restaurant is sold. He said, “he doesn’t have anyone to take over. His son is ill and one of his grandchildren wants to be a plumber, the other a doctor.”

How about selling it to the employees?

I realize that business has been way down but I suspect the people working there need their jobs and know how to run it without Gus. I also suspect the business is still profitable. I suggest that Mr. Anton either sell the business and the building to the employees or lease it to the employees while he is attempting to sell the building. Since he was planning on closing the doors he doesn’t seem to need the money right away. This would give the loyal worker a chance to improve their lives and save Gus and his family some money, and maybe even make a bit more. Perhaps the employees turned owners have some ideas to make the business more successful.

Venerable Greek restaurant in Detroit to shut doors

New Hellas restaurant closes after 107 years

Ron Paul Revolution: History in the Making. My new book.

January 11, 2008 · Posted in abundance, economics, innovation, strategy · Comment 

Click to purchase the book

My new book is just released. It goes into great details about what is driving the excitement for Ron Paul and how Freedom is the Ultimate Product for Evangelism Marketing.

During the pre-primary campaigning I’ve been able to meet Ron Paul and consult with the official campaign. I’ve been able to see the inner workings and I’ve been all over the world with the grassroots. Ron Paul’s success is a perfect example of evangelism marketing and the abundance society at work. Ron Paul’s campaign is the epitome of evangelism marketing. None of the success has been from anything the national campaign has done. The fund raising, the signs everywhere, the posts all over the Internet are all from individuals acting on their own to promote the idea.

Factors like the Long-Tail as described by Chris Anderson of Wired Magazine have enabled Ron Paul’s supporters to set records for fund raising. Open Source techniques are being used to propel ideas into action and even fund $300,000 projects. This type of free innovation overcomes the scarcity economics.

Few people understand what is going on with the Ron Paul campaign, not the media, not the competition, and not even Ron Paul’s staff. The new culture based on abundance is taking hold and its powered by freedom. I’ve talked with the top staffers in Ron Paul’s campaign many times, and even Ron Paul himself. They don’t have a clue about evangelism marketing, they just know something is working. I can only imagine how big this campaign would be if they had implemented the 22 elements for a complete evangelism system. Ron Paul himself does do the most important thing, he tells the truth.

Many of the 22 elements of a complete evangelism marketing campaign have been implemented by supporters. That is the power of evangelism, abundance and freedom.

Here is a sample chapter.

The Largest Minority

The industrial revolution focused on mass marketing. Success was achieved by making common items in the most cost efficient manner to sell to large groups of people. Standardization was the hallmark of the 19th and 20th century, but as the Information age emerged it became possible for the universal truth of individuality to move to the forefront. The potential for mass customization became reality and is totally revolutionizing every aspect of life. Oddly enough the information age, re-popularizes the ideas codified 230 years ago in the Constitution of the united States of America. The individual is King.

The Ron Paul Revolution benefits from a phenomenon described by what publisher of Wired magazine, Chris Anderson, calls “The Long Tail” In his article in Wired Magazine and his book of the same name, he pointed out that 98% of the Top 10,000 books carried by sell at least one copy per month. That means there is a market for every imaginable subject.

Read more

Crystal ball says, "In 6 months you'll be laid off." What do you do?

December 26, 2006 · Posted in economics, innovation · Comment 

In the Detroit area the economy has been brutal. A bunch of people have been laid off. Many would have loved 6 months of warning but the truth is almost everyone that’s been laid off had much more than 6 months warning and they didn’t do anything. That’s not to say they were lazy or stupid. Most of these people didn’t know what the warning signs were. And the rest didn’t know what to do so they did nothing and simply watched their financial future go off a cliff. Now they are unemployed, many have experienced bankruptcy and we aren’t even suppose to be in a recession.

It doesn’t have to be that way. There are a few very simple to spot signs and even better there is something you can do if you see the warning signs.

  • Higher price per unit
  • Fewer units sold
  • Fewer opportunities for advancement

Is your per unit pay increasing? If you get paid by the hour or even an annual salary is it going up? This is a very bad sign. Huh? Getting paid more is bad? No, getting paid more is great. Getting paid more per unit is bad. It’s the first step towards the cliff. If you can for a moment, look at it from the customer’s view point. You go to the store and the price of bread goes up. For a while that might be OK. And if the quality of bread gets better then you don’t mind at all. But if the price keeps going up and up you start to think, “hey can I get bread somewhere else without paying as much?”

The most dangerous part of an increasing price per unit situation is when you are making the money, you don’t see the problem coming. You might sell fewer units, in this case that means get more time off, cool. You are making more per hour so your income stays the same or even goes up. You don’t see any problem. And there might not be a problem, but sooner or later someone will move in and do your job for less money than you are doing it. Remember, you used to do your job for less money.

Again, you might not care right away that someone else will do your job for less money. And maybe you are doing a different job or you are more productive so you feel its not an accurate comparison. You still are at risk. You probably did what anyone would do when they made more money. You spent more money. I remember when I was in college. Every week I would take out $20 from my checking account and it would last me all week or more. Now I take out $300 and that doesn’t count the house payments, car insurance, cell phone bill, cable bill, etc. I used to live very happily on $24,000 a year and now I need $80,000 to just pay the bills. How about you? Have your expenses increased? How much do you need now?

So when you are way up at the top of the price per unit scale you discover you can’t go any higher. And there are a bunch of guys below you moving up the ladder right behind you. There isn’t any place to move up and you can’t turn around. And that is when you see the cliff and the pink slip.

What is the solution?

There are two solutions. Both require innovation. But you must first understand that in order to successfully innovate you must provide more value to someone and preferably to more people. Again, picture yourself at the store. If your favorite store consistently lowered their prices you would be very happy. You would tell your friends. If your favorite store lowered their prices and increased quality and service you would never leave. You would probably refuse to shop anywhere else and insist your friends do the same.

That is exactly what you need to do in your life. Provide more, better, with less hassle or cost.

That can’t be done with more time. It only happens with some serious innovation. Aren’t you glad I also teach how to achieve serious innovation?

So the first approach is to recognize early that your on the march up to the top of the price per unit cliff and change directions. What if you can already see the edge coming? What can you do? Easy, choose a different path.

There are lots of customers in the world, 6 billion at last count, with more each day. As each need is met customers look for a new “more, better, for less”. Find one that matches your abilities and start making your new customers happy. In business speak this is creating a new or expanding an existing market. How can you do that?

Use Predictive Innovation.

  1. Identify the ideal product or service
  2. Choose one unmet need
  3. Plug that need into the solution grid to generate at least 15 solutions
  4. Rank the solutions by value
  5. Generate the opportunity map
  6. Follow the opportunity map to satisfy each need in order of value.

Here is a clue if you didn’t already realize it. The same rules apply to businesses. And if you are in charge of a business on the path heading towards the cliff you can prevent that fatal leap. Remember if you don’t stop the business from heading over the cliff its more than one person getting laid off. All the families of the workers depend on you to make a good decision.

Now is the time to learn how to innovate. It isn’t magic and doesn’t require some special creative talent. It just takes learning and applying an effective system, Predictive Innovation can help.

Action Items

  • Look for the warning signs in your job, business, and industry.
  • Think of at least one part of your product or service which is less than ideal.
  • List three ways to improve that one feature that is less than ideal (you don’t need to know how to achieve it, just the basic approach)
  • Sign up to receive free reports about Predictive Innovation

Side notes: Even high tech companies like Sun experience lay offs and the people moved past it by finding new markets for their skills and talents.

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